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Thursday, March 3

  1. page Queer Performativity edited ... In Touching Feeling: Affect, Pedagogy, Performativity, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick writes about quee…
    ...
    In Touching Feeling: Affect, Pedagogy, Performativity, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick writes about queer performativity in Chapter 1, "Shame, Theatricality, and Queer Performativity: Henry James's The Art of The Novel." While this Chapter is focused on Henry James' novel, in it she suggests a framework for understanding queer performativity in relation to notions of shame. She writes, "In this usage, 'queer performativity' is the name of a strategy for the production of meaning and being, in relation to the affect shame and to the later and related fact of stigma" (61). While Sedgwick does not define queer performativity, she suggests that “most of the performative identity vernaculars that seem most recognizably ‘flushed’ […] with shame consciousness […] cluster intimately around lesbian and gay worldly space” (63). She also writes of the “‘torsions’ or aberrances between reference and performativity or indeed between queerness and other ways of experiencing identity and desire” (63). By queering performativity, she refigures the nature of performance in an attempt to create new dialogues about identity.
    http://academicearth.org/lectures/queer-theory-gender-performativity
    {http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f9/Eve_Kosofsky_Sedgwick_by_David_Shankbone.jpg/240px-Eve_Kosofsky_Sedgwick_by_David_Shankbone.jpg} 12121211
    “Persons who self-identify as queer will be those whose subjectivity is lodged in refusals or deflections of (or by) the logic of the heterosexual supplement; in far less simple associations attaching to state authority and religious sanction; in far less complacent relation to the witness of others. The emergence of the first person, of the singular, of the active, and of the indicative are all questions rather than presumptions for queer performativity” (Sedgwick 71).
    (view changes)
  2. page Queer Performativity edited ... In Touching Feeling: Affect, Pedagogy, Performativity, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick writes about quee…
    ...
    In Touching Feeling: Affect, Pedagogy, Performativity, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick writes about queer performativity in Chapter 1, "Shame, Theatricality, and Queer Performativity: Henry James's The Art of The Novel." While this Chapter is focused on Henry James' novel, in it she suggests a framework for understanding queer performativity in relation to notions of shame. She writes, "In this usage, 'queer performativity' is the name of a strategy for the production of meaning and being, in relation to the affect shame and to the later and related fact of stigma" (61). While Sedgwick does not define queer performativity, she suggests that “most of the performative identity vernaculars that seem most recognizably ‘flushed’ […] with shame consciousness […] cluster intimately around lesbian and gay worldly space” (63). She also writes of the “‘torsions’ or aberrances between reference and performativity or indeed between queerness and other ways of experiencing identity and desire” (63). By queering performativity, she refigures the nature of performance in an attempt to create new dialogues about identity.
    http://academicearth.org/lectures/queer-theory-gender-performativity
    {http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f9/Eve_Kosofsky_Sedgwick_by_David_Shankbone.jpg/240px-Eve_Kosofsky_Sedgwick_by_David_Shankbone.jpg} 12121211
    “Persons who self-identify as queer will be those whose subjectivity is lodged in refusals or deflections of (or by) the logic of the heterosexual supplement; in far less simple associations attaching to state authority and religious sanction; in far less complacent relation to the witness of others. The emergence of the first person, of the singular, of the active, and of the indicative are all questions rather than presumptions for queer performativity” (Sedgwick 71).
    (view changes)

Saturday, June 20

  1. page Queer Performativity edited ... queer destabilizes notion the notions of power ... term" (230). In Touching Feel…
    ...
    queer destabilizes notionthe notions of power
    ...
    term" (230).
    In Touching Feeling: Affect, Pedagogy, Performativity, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick writes about queer performativity in Chapter 1, "Shame, Theatricality, and Queer Performativity: Henry James's The Art of The Novel." While this Chapter is focused on Henry James' novel, in it she suggests a framework for understanding queer performativity in relation to notions of shame. She writes, "In this usage, 'queer performativity' is the name of a strategy for the production of meaning and being, in relation to the affect shame and to the later and related fact of stigma" (61). While Sedgwick does not define queer performativity, she suggests that “most of the performative identity vernaculars that seem most recognizably ‘flushed’ […] with shame consciousness […] cluster intimately around lesbian and gay worldly space” (63). She also writes of the “‘torsions’ or aberrances between reference and performativity or indeed between queerness and other ways of experiencing identity and desire” (63). By queering performativity, she refigures the nature of performance in an attempt to create new dialogues about identity.
    http://academicearth.org/lectures/queer-theory-gender-performativity
    (view changes)

Tuesday, December 14

  1. page Gender Performativity edited ... In Bodies that Matter, she reads this gender performativity in terms of Austin’s example of th…
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    In Bodies that Matter, she reads this gender performativity in terms of Austin’s example of the speech act, “I do,” in the heterosexual marriage ceremony. In this book, Butler questions “from where and when does such a performative draw its force and what happens to the performative when its purpose is precisely to undo the presumptive force of the heterosexual ceremonial” (225)? One of her conclusions is that power acts as discourse, inextricably linking power structures with the performance of identity, suggesting that gender performance implicates interpellated ideologies. One of her major points in identifying gender as performative is to illustrate that gender is not a stable, universal identity, nor is it separate from the regimes of power and discourse.
    {http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/85/Judith_Butler_cropped.jpg/200px-Judith_Butler_cropped.jpg}
    ==

    (view changes)
    4:59 pm

Monday, December 13

  1. page home edited This wiki represents work completed for the Key Terms Project for the Fall 2010 session of ENG 120:…
    This wiki represents work completed for the Key Terms Project for the Fall 2010 session of ENG 120: Composition Theory and the
    Teaching of Writing with Harry Denny.
    ...
    seems impossible. Instead,Instead of reinterpreting Heidegger and Derridean notions of performativity, this wiki
    (view changes)
    7:29 pm
  2. page List of Works Cited edited ... LeCourt, Donna. Identity Matters: Schooling the Student Body in Academic Discourse. New York: …
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    LeCourt, Donna. Identity Matters: Schooling the Student Body in Academic Discourse. New York: SUNY Albany, 2004.
    Sedgwick, Eve Kosofsky and Adam Frank. Touching Feeling: Affect, Pedagogy, Performativity. NC: Duke, 2004.
    Sedgwick, Eve Kosofsky. Epistemology of the Closet. Berkeley: University of CA, 1990.
    (view changes)
    7:26 pm
  3. page List of Works Cited edited ... Goffman, Erving. The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life. New York: Knopf, 1959. LeCourt, D…
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    Goffman, Erving. The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life. New York: Knopf, 1959.
    LeCourt, Donna. Identity Matters: Schooling the Student Body in Academic Discourse. New York: SUNY Albany, 2004.
    Sedgwick, Eve Kosofsky and Adam Frank. Touching Feeling: Affect, Pedagogy, Performativity. NC: Duke, 2004.
    Sedgwick, Eve Kosofsky. Epistemology of the Closet. Berkeley: University of CA, 1990.
    (view changes)
    7:23 pm
  4. page Queer Performativity edited In While it is difficult to determine an exact definition of queer performativity, Judith Butler …
    InWhile it is difficult to determine an exact definition of queer performativity, Judith Butler and Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick outline its nature indirectly, creating a vague idea of the concept. In Bodies that
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    Judith Butler discusses the meaning of the wordexplains "queer" through the idea of performativity. InShe encourages her perception, "queer" should be used and understoodreaders to understand queer as a
    ...
    instead of the noun that assumes a noun; queerness is not a stable or fixed identity. To use "queer" as a verb "queers" stable identity categories, their formationsInstead, queering the notion of queer destabilizes notion of power and histories, and converging relations of power. To remain queer,agency. In her understanding, the term Queer must constantlyidea of queerness should be resignified and reworked, and itconstantly reworked; this is "necessary
    ...
    the term" (Butler 230).
    In
    (230).
    In
    Touching Feeling:
    ...
    Chapter 1, entitled, "Shame, Theatricality,
    ...
    stigma" (61).
    To
    While Sedgwick does not define queer something means to understandperformativity, she suggests that “most of the performative identity vernaculars that seem most recognizably ‘flushed’ […] with shame consciousness […] cluster intimately around lesbian and questiongay worldly space” (63). She also writes of the histories“‘torsions’ or aberrances between reference and performativity or indeed between queerness and other ways of termsexperiencing identity and desire” (63). By queering performativity, she refigures the nature of performance in attemptsan attempt to constructcreate new dialogues for ideas about identification, boundaries, passing, temporality, and resistance.
    sedgwick on sept. 11 revised earlier notions of Queer Performativity
    identity.
    http://academicearth.org/lectures/queer-theory-gender-performativity
    {http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f9/Eve_Kosofsky_Sedgwick_by_David_Shankbone.jpg/240px-Eve_Kosofsky_Sedgwick_by_David_Shankbone.jpg}
    “Persons who self-identify as queer will be those whose subjectivity is lodged in refusals or deflections of (or by) the logic of the heterosexual supplement; in far less simple associations attaching to state authority and religious sanction; in far less complacent relation to the witness of others. The emergence of the first person, of the singular, of the active, and of the indicative are all questions rather than presumptions for queer performativity” (Sedgwick 71).

    (view changes)
    7:20 pm
  5. page Queer Performativity edited In Bodies that Matter, Judith Butler discusses the meaning of the word "queer" through pe…
    In Bodies that Matter, Judith Butler discusses the meaning of the word "queer" through performativity. In her perception, "queer" should be used and understood as a verb instead of the noun that assumes a fixed identity. To use "queer" as a verb "queers" stable identity categories, their formations and histories, and converging relations of power. To remain queer, the term Queer must constantly be resignified and reworked, and it is "necessary to affirm the contingency of the term" (Butler 230).
    ...
    of shame. She writes, "In this usage, 'queer performativity' is the name of a strategy for the production of meaning and being, in relation to the affect shame and to the later and related fact of stigma" (61).
    To queer something means to understand and question the histories and performativity of terms in attempts to construct new dialogues for ideas about identification, boundaries, passing, temporality, and resistance.
    sedgwick on sept. 11 revised earlier notions of Queer Performativity
    (view changes)
    6:47 pm

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